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The Paradox of Self-Organizing Teams

What’s wrong with this scenario? Bob, your VP of Engineering brings a ScrumMaster, a Java developer, a UX (user experience) specialist, and a Linux admin into his office. “We need to build this widget app,” he says, describing what a product manager told him she wanted. “So go ahead and self-organize.”

Bob’s intentions are good, right? After all, Agile teams are supposed to be self-organizing. Instead of giving the team specific directions, he laid out the general goal and then asked the team to organize themselves in order to achieve the goal. What could be more Agile than that?

Anonymous_emblem.svgDo you see the problem yet? Let’s shed a bit more light by snooping on the next meeting.

The four techies move to a conference room. The ScrumMaster says, “I’m here to make sure you have what you need, and to mentor you as needed. But you three have to self-organize.”

The other three look at each other. “Uh, I guess I’ll be the Java developer,” the Java developer says.

“I’ll be responsible for the user interface,” the UX person says.

“I guess I’ll be responsible for ops,” the admin volunteers.

Excellent! The team is now self-organized!

Read the entire article at http://www.devx.com/blog/agile/the-paradox-of-self-organizing-teams.html.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Jason Bloomberg

Jason Bloomberg is a leading IT industry analyst, Forbes contributor, keynote speaker, and globally recognized expert on multiple disruptive trends in enterprise technology and digital transformation. He is ranked #5 on Onalytica’s list of top Digital Transformation influencers for 2018 and #15 on Jax’s list of top DevOps influencers for 2017, the only person to appear on both lists.

As founder and president of Agile Digital Transformation analyst firm Intellyx, he advises, writes, and speaks on a diverse set of topics, including digital transformation, artificial intelligence, cloud computing, devops, big data/analytics, cybersecurity, blockchain/bitcoin/cryptocurrency, no-code/low-code platforms and tools, organizational transformation, internet of things, enterprise architecture, SD-WAN/SDX, mainframes, hybrid IT, and legacy transformation, among other topics.

Mr. Bloomberg’s articles in Forbes are often viewed by more than 100,000 readers. During his career, he has published over 1,200 articles (over 200 for Forbes alone), spoken at over 400 conferences and webinars, and he has been quoted in the press and blogosphere over 2,000 times.

Mr. Bloomberg is the author or coauthor of four books: The Agile Architecture Revolution (Wiley, 2013), Service Orient or Be Doomed! How Service Orientation Will Change Your Business (Wiley, 2006), XML and Web Services Unleashed (SAMS Publishing, 2002), and Web Page Scripting Techniques (Hayden Books, 1996). His next book, Agile Digital Transformation, is due within the next year.

At SOA-focused industry analyst firm ZapThink from 2001 to 2013, Mr. Bloomberg created and delivered the Licensed ZapThink Architect (LZA) Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) course and associated credential, certifying over 1,700 professionals worldwide. He is one of the original Managing Partners of ZapThink LLC, which was acquired by Dovel Technologies in 2011.

Prior to ZapThink, Mr. Bloomberg built a diverse background in eBusiness technology management and industry analysis, including serving as a senior analyst in IDC’s eBusiness Advisory group, as well as holding eBusiness management positions at USWeb/CKS (later marchFIRST) and WaveBend Solutions (now Hitachi Consulting), and several software and web development positions.

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