Welcome!

Machine Learning Authors: Elizabeth White, Pat Romanski, Yeshim Deniz, Liz McMillan, Zakia Bouachraoui

News Feed Item

NXP Semiconductors: The Wearable Revolution Has Already Begun

The Following Is a Statement by Bart De Loore

SAN JOSE, CA -- (Marketwired) -- 07/17/14 -- NXP Semiconductors has been actively developing technology for the first true wearable, hearing aids, for nearly two decades. NXP believes health-related applications will become a key driver for the success of wearables.

There is plenty of discussion these days about 'wearable technology', and many consumer electronics companies have ventured into the market with a range of offerings. Everything from 'smart watches' and augmented reality glasses, to t-shirts printed with graphics that respond to sound. Many of these are still in their infancy or are destined to be short-lived gadgets, and so far none of these products can be said to have made a significant impact on consumers.

However, in the health sector, wearable technology has both found a ready market and is already making a significant impact. While applied mostly for treatment today, wearable technology can have far bigger impact if applied earlier in the health care cycle: increasing individual's health consciousness, coaching them to live healthier and screening for early signs of diseases.

Wearables will empower the worried-well to take ownership of their health, and facilitate assisted living for the elderly or disabled. Wearables can help prevent, diagnose early and more effectively treat diseases and lower healthcare system costs.

Beneficial to both individuals and society, health-related applications will become the key driver for the success of wearables. Not surprisingly, recent announcements of wearable market shapers demonstrate their increased health focus.

The first true wearable

It could be said that the original and most widely used type of wearable device is the hearing instrument. Well over 12 million devices are supplied every year, making it the de facto largest and a long-lived wearable market.

Electrical technology for these has a history as long as the telephone -- replacing the traditional (and questionably effective!) hearing trumpets when people started adapting telephone receivers to help improve their hearing. Wearability of hearing instruments evolved when moving to vacuum tube and later discrete transistor amplification. When Jack Kilby invented the integrated circuit in 1958, one of its first commercial applications was the BTE (behind-the-ear) hearing aid.

Since then advances in hearing aids are driven by end user experience. Ease of use has been improved with developments such as wireless connectivity and battery life time extension. Performance was boosted by means of more advanced signal processing, while miniaturization made devices ever-lighter and smaller.

Decades of wearable experience at NXP

NXP has been actively developing the technology to make wearable medical devices possible and practical, and is currently applying its experience to several new applications. It has worked with industry leading OEMs for nearly two decades, on devices powering hearing aids as well as hearing implants.

To meet the hearing industry's demanding requirements NXP has developed and deployed cutting edge high performance mixed signal solutions.

Highly integrated and optimized for ultra-low power operation, these devices are tiny and run from a tiny 1V zinc air battery.
They encompass highly sensitive analogue front-ends, low gate count powerful Digital Signal Processors, non-volatile memory and wireless connectivity streaming data and audio robustly around and safely through the body.

What's next for wearables?

Future wearables will provide insight in your well-being, advise how to get better, give early warning to seek professional support, and inform caregivers and nurses of patients in need of help.

Body-worn sensors will produce the raw data. They will be highly sensitive, very small, battery operated and can be placed anywhere on your body. They will be embedded in a wireless body area network which connects to the cloud via watch or smartphone much in the way today's comparatively simple fitness trackers do. Smart algorithms will turn sensor data into actionable information, which will be tailored to the intended recipient.

Hearing instruments do all of this, today. Having powered several generations of them, NXP is well-positioned and ready to address the unique needs of the wearable market.

About the author, Bart De Loore:

Bart firmly believes wearable semiconductor solutions will revolutionize well-being and healthcare. As Vice President responsible for NXP's Personal Health business, he is driving smart solutions for healthier living. Those solutions will help prevent, diagnose early and more effectively treat diseases while containing health care costs. - See more at: http://blog.nxp.com/the-wearable-revolution-has-already-begun/#sthash.lY5d3dEZ.dpuf

Image Available: http://www2.marketwire.com/mw/frame_mw?attachid=2641635
Image Available: http://www2.marketwire.com/mw/frame_mw?attachid=2641637
Image Available: http://www2.marketwire.com/mw/frame_mw?attachid=2641639

Contact:
Todd Hallinan
Digital Communications Manager
[email protected]

More Stories By Marketwired .

Copyright © 2009 Marketwired. All rights reserved. All the news releases provided by Marketwired are copyrighted. Any forms of copying other than an individual user's personal reference without express written permission is prohibited. Further distribution of these materials is strictly forbidden, including but not limited to, posting, emailing, faxing, archiving in a public database, redistributing via a computer network or in a printed form.

CloudEXPO Stories
Andrew Keys is Co-Founder of ConsenSys Enterprise. He comes to ConsenSys Enterprise with capital markets, technology and entrepreneurial experience. Previously, he worked for UBS investment bank in equities analysis. Later, he was responsible for the creation and distribution of life settlement products to hedge funds and investment banks. After, he co-founded a revenue cycle management company where he learned about Bitcoin and eventually Ethereal. Andrew's role at ConsenSys Enterprise is a multi-faceted approach of strategy and enterprise business development. Andrew graduated from Loyola University in Maryland and University of Auckland with degrees in economics and international finance.
The revocation of Safe Harbor has radically affected data sovereignty strategy in the cloud. In his session at 17th Cloud Expo, Jeff Miller, Product Management at Cavirin Systems, discussed how to assess these changes across your own cloud strategy, and how you can mitigate risks previously covered under the agreement.
Digital Initiatives create new ways of conducting business, which drive the need for increasingly advanced security and regulatory compliance challenges with exponentially more damaging consequences. In the BMC and Forbes Insights Survey in 2016, 97% of executives said they expect a rise in data breach attempts in the next 12 months. Sixty percent said operations and security teams have only a general understanding of each other’s requirements, resulting in a “SecOps gap” leaving organizations unable to mobilize to protect themselves. The result: many enterprises face unnecessary risks to data loss and production downtime.
In his session at 21st Cloud Expo, Raju Shreewastava, founder of Big Data Trunk, provided a fun and simple way to introduce Machine Leaning to anyone and everyone. He solved a machine learning problem and demonstrated an easy way to be able to do machine learning without even coding. Raju Shreewastava is the founder of Big Data Trunk (www.BigDataTrunk.com), a Big Data Training and consulting firm with offices in the United States. He previously led the data warehouse/business intelligence and Big Data teams at Autodesk. He is a contributing author of book on Azure and Big Data published by SAMS.
While some developers care passionately about how data centers and clouds are architected, for most, it is only the end result that matters. To the majority of companies, technology exists to solve a business problem, and only delivers value when it is solving that problem. 2017 brings the mainstream adoption of containers for production workloads. In his session at 21st Cloud Expo, Ben McCormack, VP of Operations at Evernote, discussed how data centers of the future will be managed, how the public cloud best suits your organization, and what the future holds for operations and infrastructure engineers in a post-container world. Is a serverless world inevitable?