Welcome!

Machine Learning Authors: Yeshim Deniz, Liz McMillan, Elizabeth White, Pat Romanski, Corey Roth

Related Topics: Machine Learning , Agile Computing

Machine Learning : Article

Achieving Business and IT Agility with Enterprise Web 2.0

Web 2.0 technologies promise to turn the Internet into a true application platform

Web 2.0 technologies promise to turn the Internet into a true application platform, featuring robust client-side logic and rich interfaces that put users back in control of application flow. For the enterprise IT community, achieving the aims of Web 2.0 requires looking beyond the adoption of popular Rich Internet Applications (RIAs) development languages like AJAX, Flash, Java, and .NET.

Companies looking to implement an Enterprise Web 2.0 (EW2.0) strategy require a platform that provides standardization and simplification across different business applications and development technologies, while enabling the flexibility required for innovation within business units, otherwise called "common flexibility." The platform must provide Web 2.0 applications with a reliable and secure communication between client and server - whether online, offline or mobile - across any network. Finally, it needs to support Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) initiatives by enabling the consumption of loosely coupled services that provide access to business functionality and data in real time, while leveraging existing code, development standards, tools, skills and infrastructure.

Over the last 20 years, mainstream enterprise applications have swung back and forth between server- and client-centric architectures. Originally, mainframe architectures were server-based and sent the user interface (UI) to display terminals. In the 1990s, attracted by the power of graphical desktop environments like Microsoft Windows, the pendulum swung to the other end of the spectrum - client/server, which was entirely client-based except for server-side databases. In the late 1990s, the next pendulum swing was caused by the low-cost, global deployment model of the Web, leading to the development of browser-based HTML and J2EE applications, which were again, entirely server-based with the UI running on the client-side browsers.

Today, the architectural flexibility of Web 2.0 offers developers the best of both worlds. By delivering the high performance and robust functionality of desktop or client/server - combined with the universal reinstall deployment and centralized management of browser-based applications - EW2.0 applications deliver a quantum operational efficiency and end-user productivity, while decreasing IT costs. For the first time in 30 years of application development, EW2.0 enables application developers to partition client- and server-side layers, using appropriate technologies to meet different business objectives and specific end-user requirements.

Although EW2.0 architectures combine the best qualities of their historic predecessors, there are some lingering challenges surrounding integration, security, UI development and performance. To overcome these challenges, enterprise IT organizations should consider implementing a "reference architecture" that provides these services consistently to all EW2.0 developers, regardless of their development technology and target deployment platforms.

The EW2.0 application landscape currently includes a mix of Java, .NET, AJAX, and Flash on the client side; different ways of communicating between client and server; different server technologies ranging from HTTP servers to J2EE; different ways to integrate data sources; as well as many different business processes and services, development tools, and methodologies. Simply put, there is a lot of complexity and heterogeneity to manage.

An EW2.0 reference architecture provides "common flexibility." In other words, it gives EW2.0 application developers common services and architecture without limiting the capability to leverage different landscape components and approaches to meet specific business needs. It provides a higher level of abstraction to enable developers to focus on application requirements rather than being bogged down with platform or technology specifics. This way, developers can integrate various existing systems without rewriting them, creating a composite application that can be universally deployed.

By implementing an EW2.0 reference architecture that provides "common flexibility," companies become more agile and significantly decrease the cost and risk of application development and deployment. Companies will be able to reduce development, deployment, and maintenance costs; improve responsiveness to business drivers; and reduce technology investment risk. As such, developers can build applications - using AJAX, Flash, Java, or .NET - that best suit the needs of the enterprise.

More Stories By Coach Wei

Coach Wei is founder and CEO of Yottaa, a web performance optimization company. He is also founder and Chairman of Nexaweb, an enterprise application modernization software company. Coding, running, magic, robot, big data, speed...are among his favorite list of things (not necessarily in that order. His coding capability is really at PowerPoint level right now). Caffeine, doing something entrepreneurial and getting out of sleeping are three reasons that he gets up in the morning and gets really excited.

Comments (0)

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


CloudEXPO Stories
When talking IoT we often focus on the devices, the sensors, the hardware itself. The new smart appliances, the new smart or self-driving cars (which are amalgamations of many ‘things'). When we are looking at the world of IoT, we should take a step back, look at the big picture. What value are these devices providing. IoT is not about the devices, its about the data consumed and generated. The devices are tools, mechanisms, conduits. This paper discusses the considerations when dealing with the massive amount of information associated with these devices. Ed presented sought out sessions at CloudEXPO Silicon Valley 2017 and CloudEXPO New York 2017. He is a regular contributor to Cloud Computing Journal.
DXWorldEXPO LLC announced today that Kevin Jackson joined the faculty of CloudEXPO's "10-Year Anniversary Event" which will take place on November 11-13, 2018 in New York City. Kevin L. Jackson is a globally recognized cloud computing expert and Founder/Author of the award winning "Cloud Musings" blog. Mr. Jackson has also been recognized as a "Top 100 Cybersecurity Influencer and Brand" by Onalytica (2015), a Huffington Post "Top 100 Cloud Computing Experts on Twitter" (2013) and a "Top 50 Cloud Computing Blogger for IT Integrators" by CRN (2015). Mr. Jackson's professional career includes service in the US Navy Space Systems Command, Vice President J.P. Morgan Chase, Worldwide Sales Executive for IBM and NJVC Vice President, Cloud Services. He is currently part of a team responsible for onboarding mission applications to the US Intelligence Community cloud computing environment (IC ...
Poor data quality and analytics drive down business value. In fact, Gartner estimated that the average financial impact of poor data quality on organizations is $9.7 million per year. But bad data is much more than a cost center. By eroding trust in information, analytics and the business decisions based on these, it is a serious impediment to digital transformation.
When applications are hosted on servers, they produce immense quantities of logging data. Quality engineers should verify that apps are producing log data that is existent, correct, consumable, and complete. Otherwise, apps in production are not easily monitored, have issues that are difficult to detect, and cannot be corrected quickly. Tom Chavez presents the four steps that quality engineers should include in every test plan for apps that produce log output or other machine data. Learn the steps so your team's apps not only function but also can be monitored and understood from their machine data when running in production.
To Really Work for Enterprises, MultiCloud Adoption Requires Far Better and Inclusive Cloud Monitoring and Cost Management … But How? Overwhelmingly, even as enterprises have adopted cloud computing and are expanding to multi-cloud computing, IT leaders remain concerned about how to monitor, manage and control costs across hybrid and multi-cloud deployments. It’s clear that traditional IT monitoring and management approaches, designed after all for on-premises data centers, are falling short in this new hybrid and dynamic environment.