Welcome!

Machine Learning Authors: Yeshim Deniz, Pat Romanski, Liz McMillan, Elizabeth White, Corey Roth

Related Topics: Microservices Expo, Java IoT, Containers Expo Blog, Cognitive Computing , Machine Learning , @CloudExpo

Microservices Expo: Article

AWS Out to Dethrone Apple, Google

The Telegraph suggests that Amazon is out to “own the Internet” by leveraging a “different backdoor” than Google

Andy Jassy, the head of Amazon's cloud business and the Harvard MBA who wrote its business plan, told the Sunday Telegraph in London over the weekend that AWS could some day displace Apple as the world's most valuable tech company.

"We don't say to ourselves, ‘What we're really doing is trying to build the largest technology company in the world,'" he told the paper. "We just happen to think, with how much computing is going to move to the cloud, and with the breadth and global footprint that we have, and our continuing [commitment] to iterate at a very fast pace, it just has the chance to be the largest technology company."

Amazon doesn't break out Amazon Web Services' results, but watchers reckon it could currently be at $1 billion-$1.5 billion in revenues, supposedly profitable despite very thin margins.

"At the highest levels of this company," Jassy said, "we believe that it's quite possible that AWS ends up being the largest business in Amazon. We believe [that] passionately. Now that is saying a lot because our retail business, which is a $40 billion business, is still growing 25% to 30% year-on-year. We're not there yet and I don't know how long that will take but we see that as a real possibility."

Quoting analysts, the Telegraph suggests that Amazon is out to "own the Internet" by leveraging a "different backdoor" than Google, which is effectively supposed to own it now.

That backdoor is what Jassy touts as the "Internet operating system" as manifest in AWS.

He's convinced that cloud computing is going to predominate. "People should make no mistake about it the model that we're pursuing is going to be the dominant way that computing exists in the next 10 years. You can jump up and down all you want. You can raise all the objections that you want. You can take any bump along the way and say, ‘Look, look, look!' and try to scare people. But the reality is that if the value proposition is that compelling it is going to happen. You can't stop gravity."

And he figures Amazon's first mover advantage is going to win out over the so-called old-guard cloudwashers passing off legacy technology as the cloud. "There isn't a compression algorithm for experience. You can't learn a lot of the lessons without having [our] scale and diversity," he says.

See www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/retailandconsumer/9770827/Goliath-vs-Goliath...Amazon-takes-on-Apple-and-Google.html.

More Stories By Maureen O'Gara

Maureen O'Gara the most read technology reporter for the past 20 years, is the Cloud Computing and Virtualization News Desk editor of SYS-CON Media. She is the publisher of famous "Billygrams" and the editor-in-chief of "Client/Server News" for more than a decade. One of the most respected technology reporters in the business, Maureen can be reached by email at maureen(at)sys-con.com or paperboy(at)g2news.com, and by phone at 516 759-7025. Twitter: @MaureenOGara

Comments (0)

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


CloudEXPO Stories
Poor data quality and analytics drive down business value. In fact, Gartner estimated that the average financial impact of poor data quality on organizations is $9.7 million per year. But bad data is much more than a cost center. By eroding trust in information, analytics and the business decisions based on these, it is a serious impediment to digital transformation.
Discussions of cloud computing have evolved in recent years from a focus on specific types of cloud, to a world of hybrid cloud, and to a world dominated by the APIs that make today's multi-cloud environments and hybrid clouds possible. In this Power Panel at 17th Cloud Expo, moderated by Conference Chair Roger Strukhoff, panelists addressed the importance of customers being able to use the specific technologies they need, through environments and ecosystems that expose their APIs to make true change and transformation possible.
In an era of historic innovation fueled by unprecedented access to data and technology, the low cost and risk of entering new markets has leveled the playing field for business. Today, any ambitious innovator can easily introduce a new application or product that can reinvent business models and transform the client experience. In their Day 2 Keynote at 19th Cloud Expo, Mercer Rowe, IBM Vice President of Strategic Alliances, and Raejeanne Skillern, Intel Vice President of Data Center Group and GM, discussed how clients in this new era of innovation can apply data, technology, plus human ingenuity to springboard to advance new business value and opportunities.
With more than 30 Kubernetes solutions in the marketplace, it's tempting to think Kubernetes and the vendor ecosystem has solved the problem of operationalizing containers at scale or of automatically managing the elasticity of the underlying infrastructure that these solutions need to be truly scalable. Far from it. There are at least six major pain points that companies experience when they try to deploy and run Kubernetes in their complex environments. In this presentation, the speaker will detail these pain points and explain how cloud can address them.
The current age of digital transformation means that IT organizations must adapt their toolset to cover all digital experiences, beyond just the end users’. Today’s businesses can no longer focus solely on the digital interactions they manage with employees or customers; they must now contend with non-traditional factors. Whether it's the power of brand to make or break a company, the need to monitor across all locations 24/7, or the ability to proactively resolve issues, companies must adapt to the new world.