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The Top 10, Top 10 2013 Predictions

I figured I’d simply regurgitate what many others are expecting to happen

Like last year, everyone has their Technology predictions with their annual lists for the coming year.  Instead of coming up with my own, I figured I’d simply regurgitate what many others are expecting to happen.

Cloud computing in 2013: Two warnings: @DavidLinthicum has his two tragic cloud computing predictions for 2013 (price wars & skills shortage).  Nice to see some realism mixed with all the ‘this is the greatest.’

10 Cloud Predictions for 2013: CIO has an interesting slide show covering things like Hybrid Cloud, Management, Brokers, SDN, Outages and a few other critical components.

RSA’s Art Coviello: 8 Computer Security Predictions For 2013: Attacks grow, Hackers grow, business’s not prepared grows along with investment, analysis and intelligence to mitigate threats.

Security Predictions 2013-2014: Emerging Trends in IT and Security: SANS gets some input from various industry folks on what they think.  Areas like authentication, mobile devices, Windows 8, geo-forensics, gamification and others are highlighted

Top 6 security predictions for 2013: InformationWeek India lists FortiGuard Labs predictions covering APT, two factor auth, M2M exploits. mobile malware, and botnets.

Tech Guru Mark Anderson’s Top 10 Predictions For 2013: Forbes’ list is cool since it goes beyond just security, cloud and IT.  Yes, mobile and hacktivism are covered but also Driverless Cars, eBooks, Net TVs and the LTE vs. Fiber battle.

Top predictions, about IT predictions, for 2013: Of course I love the title and this article digs into the question of  ‘is any real insight uncovered’ with these predictions?.

Forrester: Networking predictions for 2013: ComputerWeekly shares 4 of Forrester’s report on eight critical predictions for 2013.  SDN, WLAN, Strategic sourcing and staffing make the list.

7 Predictions for Cloud Computing in 2013 That Make Perfect Sense: Back to Forbes again, this time specific to cloud.  Private clouds, personal clouds, community clouds, cloud brokers, and even a prediction that the term ‘cloud’ starts to fade.

2013 Astrology Predictions: Gotta have a little fun and give you something to look forward to based on your astrological sign.  That is, of course, if we make it past Dec 21.

Certainly not even close to an exhaustive list of all the various 2013 predictions but a good swath of what some experts believe is coming.

OK, and here are just a few of my own:

BYOD Matures – instead of managing entire device, only those corporate apps and data will be in control.  Mobile Security and BYOD come together.  Also, things like cars and TVs that have internet connections will get added to the BYOD realm.  Why couldn’t a road warrior access his VDI from the car’s NAV screen?  Why couldn’t someone check their email between commercials.  Anything with an IP and screen is game.

Major Mobile Malware – we’ve seen some here and there but think there will be a big jump in attempts to get at device’s info…especially as more BYOD gets deployed.

Cloud Classification (Pub/Pri/Hy) – lines become even more blurry as they all are used to create Hybrid Infrastructures.  No one cloud will take over but will be a part of the entire infrastructure which includes in-house, cloud, leased raised floor, and just about any place that data can live.  There might also be some movement on Cloud Standards.

More Breaches/DoS/Hacktivism – if 2012 is any indication, this will continue.

Hacker Defection – I think there will be more ex-malicious hackers going mainstream and joining legit companies – and they will expose some of the tricks of the trade.

ps

Resources

The Top 10, Top Predictions for 2012

 

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More Stories By Peter Silva

Peter is an F5 evangelist for security, IoT, mobile and core. His background in theatre brings the slightly theatrical and fairly technical together to cover training, writing, speaking, along with overall product evangelism for F5. He's also produced over 350 videos and recorded over 50 audio whitepapers. After working in Professional Theatre for 10 years, Peter decided to change careers. Starting out with a small VAR selling Netopia routers and the Instant Internet box, he soon became one of the first six Internet Specialists for AT&T managing customers on the original ATT WorldNet network.

Now having his Telco background he moved to Verio to focus on access, IP security along with web hosting. After losing a deal to Exodus Communications (now Savvis) for technical reasons, the customer still wanted Peter as their local SE contact so Exodus made him an offer he couldn’t refuse. As only the third person hired in the Midwest, he helped Exodus grow from an executive suite to two enormous datacenters in the Chicago land area working with such customers as Ticketmaster, Rolling Stone, uBid, Orbitz, Best Buy and others.

Writer, speaker and Video Host, he's also been in such plays as The Glass Menagerie, All’s Well That Ends Well, Cinderella and others.

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