Welcome!

Machine Learning Authors: Pat Romanski, Yeshim Deniz, Liz McMillan, Elizabeth White, Zakia Bouachraoui

News Feed Item

AECO Industry Predictions: Natural Disasters in 2012 Shed Light on U.S. Infrastructure Failings

Microdesk Predicts Technology to Play Key Role in Helping AECO Firms Strengthen American Infrastructure

NEW YORK, Nov. 27, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Microdesk, a leading provider of business and technology consulting services to help firms successfully plan, design, build and operate land and buildings, today unveiled its annual list of the top five architecture, engineering and construction industry predictions for 2013 at Autodesk University. Following a year in which the U.S. saw its long-neglected infrastructure system come to the forefront of national attention with natural disasters such as Hurricane Isaac and Superstorm Sandy, Microdesk predicts that in 2013 there will be a strong focus on implementing sustainable, forward-thinking solutions to rebuild the nation's crumbling roads and bridges.

The top five trends Microdesk predicts that AECO companies should prepare for in the New Year include:

  1. Rebuilding America: Post-Sandy, technology provides tangible solutions for improvement.
    From levee breaches in New Orleans to the flooding of mass transit systems in New York City, it is clear U.S. infrastructure is weak. Rather than putting a band-aid over the problem, the AECO industry must find a new approach to rebuilding that focuses on innovation and technology, and on being proactive not reactive. The tools are available, and in 2013 more firms will turn to visualization and collaborative design processes to strengthen the nation's vital infrastructure systems.
  2. Regulatory Compliance: Governments envisioning broader uses of BIM will prompt further adoption in the AECO industry.
    Despite widespread availability of technology solutions, many firms still rely on old-fashioned design and building processes. To repair this broken, siloed workflow, in 2013 the industry will see greater requirements for BIM as more government agencies develop BIM-based workflows that add efficiencies to design review and regulatory compliance. This influence will trickle down to the rest of the industry and inspire broader adoption at every level.
  3. The "I" in BIM:
    Big Data has been a hot topic in technology for several years, but in 2013, its influence will further infiltrate the AECO industry. BIM will make its way into field operation through purpose-built applications that allow designers and contractors to make informed decisions instantly and manage building data with the end uses of that information in mind. This will allow them to go beyond traditional project delivery by providing accurate, interconnected models that enable more efficient facility operations and maintenance.
  4. Mobile and the AECO Industry: The use of mobile devices in design, construction and facilities management will become commonplace in 2013.
    In 2013, the use of mobile will become an industry standard – so much so that Microdesk believes this will be the last year mobile takes a spot in its predictions. Recent acquisitions by AEC software companies of social and mobile sharing technologies, including Socialcam and Qontext, further point toward this trend. In fact, the use of next-generation technologies will become "table stakes" in 2013 for any firm looking to enable collaboration, design and communication in the field.
  5. Collaborative Design in the Cloud: A focus on cloud technologies will facilitate improved workflows.
    In 2013, the AECO industry will continue to leverage the cloud to make business more flexible and collaborative. Further adoption of cloud technologies that better enable the sharing and integration of data in the design and construction process will result in more efficient buildings, more streamlined construction processes and less waste.

"With several new advances in technology and processes on the horizon, the AECO industry is in a unique position to truly impact how we approach rebuilding our nation's infrastructure," said Michael DeLacey, president of Microdesk. "By continuing to leverage the technologies available - and embracing new technologies - the industry will set new precedents for what's possible in the design and building of roads, bridges, buildings and America's mass transit systems in 2013."

Microdesk's consulting team includes architects, engineers, surveyors, GIS analysts, facility and asset managers, IT experts and software developers. They advise some of the nation's largest architecture, engineering and construction companies, and owners, enabling them to gather valuable insight into how technological innovation has helped AECO firms both succeed in an increasingly competitive market and lay the foundation towards building a stronger infrastructure system in America.

ABOUT MICRODESK
Microdesk is a design technology consultancy that combines the leading software tools from Autodesk, Oracle, Google, Adobe and ESRI, with the latest methods, including Building Information Modeling and Virtual Design & Construction, to provide business and technology consulting services to help firms successfully plan, design, build and operate land and buildings. Microdesk is a member of the Autodesk and ESRI Developer Networks, a leading Autodesk and Oracle Primavera partner, and operates Autodesk and Google Authorized Training Centers. Microdesk has 12 offices nationwide, located in New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut, California, New York, Pennsylvania, Chicago and Washington, DC. For more information, visit www.microdesk.com.

MULTIMEDIA ELEMENTS 
Microdesk Logo

Media Contact:
Ola Lasman
Affect
212-398-9680
[email protected]

SOURCE Microdesk

More Stories By PR Newswire

Copyright © 2007 PR Newswire. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of PRNewswire content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of PRNewswire. PRNewswire shall not be liable for any errors or delays in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon.

CloudEXPO Stories
With more than 30 Kubernetes solutions in the marketplace, it's tempting to think Kubernetes and the vendor ecosystem has solved the problem of operationalizing containers at scale or of automatically managing the elasticity of the underlying infrastructure that these solutions need to be truly scalable. Far from it. There are at least six major pain points that companies experience when they try to deploy and run Kubernetes in their complex environments. In this presentation, the speaker will detail these pain points and explain how cloud can address them.
The deluge of IoT sensor data collected from connected devices and the powerful AI required to make that data actionable are giving rise to a hybrid ecosystem in which cloud, on-prem and edge processes become interweaved. Attendees will learn how emerging composable infrastructure solutions deliver the adaptive architecture needed to manage this new data reality. Machine learning algorithms can better anticipate data storms and automate resources to support surges, including fully scalable GPU-centric compute for the most data-intensive applications. Hyperconverged systems already in place can be revitalized with vendor-agnostic, PCIe-deployed, disaggregated approach to composable, maximizing the value of previous investments.
When building large, cloud-based applications that operate at a high scale, it's important to maintain a high availability and resilience to failures. In order to do that, you must be tolerant of failures, even in light of failures in other areas of your application. "Fly two mistakes high" is an old adage in the radio control airplane hobby. It means, fly high enough so that if you make a mistake, you can continue flying with room to still make mistakes. In his session at 18th Cloud Expo, Lee Atchison, Principal Cloud Architect and Advocate at New Relic, discussed how this same philosophy can be applied to highly scaled applications, and can dramatically increase your resilience to failure.
Machine learning has taken residence at our cities' cores and now we can finally have "smart cities." Cities are a collection of buildings made to provide the structure and safety necessary for people to function, create and survive. Buildings are a pool of ever-changing performance data from large automated systems such as heating and cooling to the people that live and work within them. Through machine learning, buildings can optimize performance, reduce costs, and improve occupant comfort by sharing information within the building and with outside city infrastructure via real time shared cloud capabilities.
As Cybric's Chief Technology Officer, Mike D. Kail is responsible for the strategic vision and technical direction of the platform. Prior to founding Cybric, Mike was Yahoo's CIO and SVP of Infrastructure, where he led the IT and Data Center functions for the company. He has more than 24 years of IT Operations experience with a focus on highly-scalable architectures.