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Why Cloud Servers Is the Choice for Windows VPS

Business that have been online for several years probably have some legacy code in use in various departments

Businesses basically have two choices for operating systems when shopping around for cloud servers: Windows or Linux. While Linux is cheaper and runs on many enterprise servers, businesses that run internal applications for a Windows desktop can benefit from Windows cloud servers.

The IT department and users will understand the platform more easily than were they to learn Linux. But launching an intuitive platform is only one of the advantages of cloud servers in a Windows environment.

Multiplatform Support
Business that have been online for several years probably have some legacy code in use in various departments. Fortunately, cloud servers can support multiple platforms for businesses moving towards a Windows platform.

Integration with Microsoft Azure
The latest Windows Server 2012 includes a cloud feature called Azure. Azure gives businesses the tools to create platforms as a service (PaaS) and integrates cloud server technology within an internal network. To take advantage of the Azure service, the business must setup a cloud hosting environment. Azure is more easily integrated with a corresponding Windows cloud host. The IT manager can use Microsoft’s wizard to install and configure the Azure server for cloud hosting.

More Cost Efficient for Support
Because most IT infrastructures have a lot of moving parts, system errors, downtime and desktop support can be expensive, especially when hosted internally. Having onsite personnel for any company can be expensive, and too little support can cost the company money. Hosting Windows services in the cloud eliminates much of the cost of having onsite support staff available seven days a week, 24×7. Check the contract for specifics before signing up for any particular service.

Additionally, hosting in the cloud means the company only pays for the bandwidth and server resources used each month and not a flat fee amount. Any cloud host charging a flat fee is in fact not a true cloud host. By paying for only what is used, businesses can cut down on IT infrastructure costs. As the business grows and more revenue is brought in, the cloud costs will also grow, but these costs only grow with the business’ success.

By Jennifer Marsh
Jennifer Marsh is a software developer, programmer and technology writer and occasionally blogs for
Rackspace Hosting.

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