Click here to close now.


IoT User Interface Authors: Mehdi Daoudi, Jason Bloomberg, Yeshim Deniz, Bill Szybillo, David H Deans

Related Topics: Java IoT, Industrial IoT, Microservices Expo, Containers Expo Blog, IoT User Interface, Apache

Java IoT: Blog Feed Post

Deploying APM in the Enterprise … Part 1 of More Than 1

Duct Tape, and Knives, and Hammers Oh My

It’s interesting as a parent watching your kids grow up and learn how to do things for themselves. I have 2 boys ages 6 and 7 and they often amaze me and confound me. There are times when I think they are absolutely brilliant and other times where I think that significant amounts of remedial education may be in their futures.

Duct Tape, and Knives, and Hammers Oh My
I recall a time not long ago when my kids first discovered the wonders of duct tape. What a magical substance. They really thought that you could fix anything with duct tape. Broke a lamp? Duct Tape! Cut your finger? Duct Tape! Building a boat out of sticks? Duct Tape! (Seriously, my oldest boy actually tried this.)

After getting some less than stellar results with duct tape in many situations the next wonder tool discovery was the knife. Wow, knives were amazing! They could cut your pieces of duct tape, create arrows and marshmallow holders from sticks, and generally make holes in lots of things. But alas, they eventually discovered that knives didn’t produce the blunt force required for certain jobs … but hammers did!

I’m not going to get into the gory details but let’s just say that many things got bashed beyond recognition during the “hammer phase”. Thankfully no animals were injured during this time period and our dog was smart enough to go into hiding for a few weeks until the heat blew over.

Let’s Get Real
What do these little anecdotes have to do with deploying APM in the Enterprise you ask? Great question. In most enterprise environments there are a wealth of monitoring tools that have either been built or bought. In many cases these tools are sitting around as shelf-ware or are only performing a limited subset of what they can really do. Part of the problem is that in most organizations there is little time or tolerance for learning from our mistakes. With this in mind I am going to write a series of blogs which describe my experiences of taking a large enterprise organization from APM infancy to a level of maturity most organizations only dream about.

The next question I hope you’re asking is… Why should I listen to this guy?

Another excellent question, you’re on the ball today! If you’ve read my other blog posts you might already know that I worked for a large financial services company as a monitoring architect. I was brought into the Investment Banking division to help reduce the number of incidents that were impacting end users. In a few months I (with help from many people) was able to stop the bleeding and get the organization headed down the path of APM maturity. Within a couple of years our organization was proactively seeking out and fixing performance bottlenecks as well as dynamically adapting to changes in workload demands. All in all I worked in that role for about 5 years and departed with things running very smoothly. Many applications saw significant improvement in overall response times and the number of customer impact incidents decreased by about 90%.

The Plan
I learned a lot of lessons during those years. There were many examples of success but also some failures. Those failures taught us valuable lessons that I will pass along to you over this series of blog posts. So here is a rough approximation of the topics that I plan on covering:

  • APM Maturity (not the same old boring model)
  • Where do you start?
  • Deploying APM (It’s about more than just the software)
  • Alerts done right!
  • Spreading the love. (Getting high levels of adoption)
  • Dashboards and Reports
  • Staying relevant over time.

Don’t Stab Your Brother, You Could Kill Him!
In my effort to be a good father I let my kids explore their world and give them more guidance when I think they might hurt themselves or others. It’s okay if they cut the tip of their finger with the knife but completely different if they were to stab someone with the knife. I share my knowledge with them so they won’t end up having really bad experiences but the finer details are left up to them to figure out. The same goes with this series of posts. I want to share knowledge to prevent you from stabbing your company in an artery but there are many fine points that you will need to discover as you progress on your journey.

Join me on Thursday for the next installment in this riveting series (APM Maturity), and try not to stab anyone in the mean time.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By AppDynamics Blog

In high-production environments where release cycles are measured in hours or minutes — not days or weeks — there's little room for mistakes and no room for confusion. Everyone has to understand what's happening, in real time, and have the means to do whatever is necessary to keep applications up and running optimally.

DevOps is a high-stakes world, but done well, it delivers the agility and performance to significantly impact business competitiveness.

@CloudExpo Stories
Most of the IoT Gateway scenarios involve collecting data from machines/processing and pushing data upstream to cloud for further analytics. The gateway hardware varies from Raspberry Pi to Industrial PCs. The document states the process of allowing deploying polyglot data pipelining software with the clear notion of supporting immutability. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Shashank Jain, a development architect for SAP Labs, discussed the objective, which is to automate the IoT deployment proces...
Countless business models have spawned from the IaaS industry – resell Web hosting, blogs, public cloud, and on and on. With the overwhelming amount of tools available to us, it's sometimes easy to overlook that many of them are just new skins of resources we've had for a long time. In his general session at 17th Cloud Expo, Harold Hannon, Sr. Software Architect at SoftLayer, an IBM Company, broke down what we have to work with, discussed the benefits and pitfalls and how we can best use them ...
In demand-intensive mobile and web applications, an emerging pattern is to host the Systems of Engagement in the cloud (for maximum responsiveness) but keep the Systems of Record with the other important business systems in the company datacenter, often on a tightly secured mainframe. But what about the space in between? In this IBM Redpaper publication, we show that the IBM Bluemix cloud platform offers technologies that make it easy for cloud-based SoEs to securely connect to on-premises IBM...
Discussions of cloud computing have evolved in recent years from a focus on specific types of cloud, to a world of hybrid cloud, and to a world dominated by the APIs that make today's multi-cloud environments and hybrid clouds possible. In this Power Panel at 17th Cloud Expo, moderated by Conference Chair Roger Strukhoff, panelists addressed the importance of customers being able to use the specific technologies they need, through environments and ecosystems that expose their APIs to make true ...
Microservices are a very exciting architectural approach that many organizations are looking to as a way to accelerate innovation. Microservices promise to allow teams to move away from monolithic "ball of mud" systems, but the reality is that, in the vast majority of organizations, different projects and technologies will continue to be developed at different speeds. How to handle the dependencies between these disparate systems with different iteration cycles? Consider the "canoncial problem"...
Too often with compelling new technologies market participants become overly enamored with that attractiveness of the technology and neglect underlying business drivers. This tendency, what some call the “newest shiny object syndrome” is understandable given that virtually all of us are heavily engaged in technology. But it is also mistaken. Without concrete business cases driving its deployment, IoT, like many other technologies before it, will fade into obscurity.
We all know that data growth is exploding and storage budgets are shrinking. Instead of showing you charts on about how much data there is, in his General Session at 17th Cloud Expo, Scott Cleland, Senior Director of Product Marketing at HGST, showed how to capture all of your data in one place. After you have your data under control, you can then analyze it in one place, saving time and resources.
The Internet of Things is clearly many things: data collection and analytics, wearables, Smart Grids and Smart Cities, the Industrial Internet, and more. Cool platforms like Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Intel's Galileo and Edison, and a diverse world of sensors are making the IoT a great toy box for developers in all these areas. In this Power Panel at @ThingsExpo, moderated by Conference Chair Roger Strukhoff, panelists discussed what things are the most important, which will have the most profound...
As organizations shift towards IT-as-a-service models, the need for managing & protecting data residing across physical, virtual, and now cloud environments grows with it. CommVault can ensure protection & E-Discovery of your data - whether in a private cloud, a Service Provider delivered public cloud, or a hybrid cloud environment – across the heterogeneous enterprise.
Growth hacking is common for startups to make unheard-of progress in building their business. Career Hacks can help Geek Girls and those who support them (yes, that's you too, Dad!) to excel in this typically male-dominated world. Get ready to learn the facts: Is there a bias against women in the tech / developer communities? Why are women 50% of the workforce, but hold only 24% of the STEM or IT positions? Some beginnings of what to do about it! In her Day 2 Keynote at 17th Cloud Expo, San...
Apps and devices shouldn't stop working when there's limited or no network connectivity. Learn how to bring data stored in a cloud database to the edge of the network (and back again) whenever an Internet connection is available. In his session at 17th Cloud Expo, Ben Perlmutter, a Sales Engineer with IBM Cloudant, demonstrated techniques for replicating cloud databases with devices in order to build offline-first mobile or Internet of Things (IoT) apps that can provide a better, faster user e...
SYS-CON Events announced today that Catchpoint, a global leader in monitoring, and testing the performance of online applications, has been named "Silver Sponsor" of DevOps Summit New York, which will take place on June 7-9, 2016 at the Javits Center in New York City. Catchpoint radically transforms the way businesses manage, monitor, and test the performance of online applications. Truly understand and improve user experience with clear visibility into complex, distributed online systems.Founde...
In today's enterprise, digital transformation represents organizational change even more so than technology change, as customer preferences and behavior drive end-to-end transformation across lines of business as well as IT. To capitalize on the ubiquitous disruption driving this transformation, companies must be able to innovate at an increasingly rapid pace. Traditional approaches for driving innovation are now woefully inadequate for keeping up with the breadth of disruption and change facin...
I recently attended and was a speaker at the 4th International Internet of @ThingsExpo at the Santa Clara Convention Center. I also had the opportunity to attend this event last year and I wrote a blog from that show talking about how the “Enterprise Impact of IoT” was a key theme of last year’s show. I was curious to see if the same theme would still resonate 365 days later and what, if any, changes I would see in the content presented.
The revocation of Safe Harbor has radically affected data sovereignty strategy in the cloud. In his session at 17th Cloud Expo, Jeff Miller, Product Management at Cavirin Systems, discussed how to assess these changes across your own cloud strategy, and how you can mitigate risks previously covered under the agreement.
Cloud computing delivers on-demand resources that provide businesses with flexibility and cost-savings. The challenge in moving workloads to the cloud has been the cost and complexity of ensuring the initial and ongoing security and regulatory (PCI, HIPAA, FFIEC) compliance across private and public clouds. Manual security compliance is slow, prone to human error, and represents over 50% of the cost of managing cloud applications. Determining how to automate cloud security compliance is critical...
Culture is the most important ingredient of DevOps. The challenge for most organizations is defining and communicating a vision of beneficial DevOps culture for their organizations, and then facilitating the changes needed to achieve that. Often this comes down to an ability to provide true leadership. As a CIO, are your direct reports IT managers or are they IT leaders? The hard truth is that many IT managers have risen through the ranks based on their technical skills, not their leadership ab...
In his General Session at DevOps Summit, Asaf Yigal, Co-Founder & VP of Product at, explored the value of Kibana 4 for log analysis and provided a hands-on tutorial on how to set up Kibana 4 and get the most out of Apache log files. He examined three use cases: IT operations, business intelligence, and security and compliance. Asaf Yigal is co-founder and VP of Product at log analytics software company In the past, he was co-founder of social-trading platform Currensee, which...
The Internet of Things (IoT) is growing rapidly by extending current technologies, products and networks. By 2020, Cisco estimates there will be 50 billion connected devices. Gartner has forecast revenues of over $300 billion, just to IoT suppliers. Now is the time to figure out how you’ll make money – not just create innovative products. With hundreds of new products and companies jumping into the IoT fray every month, there’s no shortage of innovation. Despite this, McKinsey/VisionMobile data...
Just over a week ago I received a long and loud sustained applause for a presentation I delivered at this year’s Cloud Expo in Santa Clara. I was extremely pleased with the turnout and had some very good conversations with many of the attendees. Over the next few days I had many more meaningful conversations and was not only happy with the results but also learned a few new things. Here is everything I learned in those three days distilled into three short points.