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Agile and Process

Agile manifesto explicitly states that agile values individual and interactions over process and tool

Agile manifesto explicitly states that agile values individual and interactions over process and tool.

 

What does it really mean? Does it mean…

…do not be a slave to the process, or

…it is not necessary to have a clearly defined way of working, or

…every individual can choose to work in his own way, or

…every team should decide their own way of working, or

…within the guiding framework of the methodology adopted, the team should tailor it to suit its liking.

What is a Process?

  • Daily stand-up meeting?
  • Daily build?
  • Code peer review?
  • Writing regression test?
  • Retrospective meeting?
  • Source version management?

I can go on and on with this list but the point is if you have decided to adopt some of them would you allow a team member to not follow it?

Would you allow one team to drop the practice?

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More Stories By Udayan Banerjee

Udayan Banerjee is CTO at NIIT Technologies Ltd, an IT industry veteran with more than 30 years' experience. He blogs at http://setandbma.wordpress.com.
The blog focuses on emerging technologies like cloud computing, mobile computing, social media aka web 2.0 etc. It also contains stuff about agile methodology and trends in architecture. It is a world view seen through the lens of a software service provider based out of Bangalore and serving clients across the world. The focus is mostly on...

  • Keep the hype out and project a realistic picture
  • Uncover trends not very apparent
  • Draw conclusion from real life experience
  • Point out fallacy & discrepancy when I see them
  • Talk about trends which I find interesting
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