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Microsoft Cloud: Blog Post

Office 365 - Installing and Configuring ADFS 2.0 for Single Sign-on

Free learning resources to make the process easy and straightforward

I've been talking with IT Pros in my community about integrating ADFS 2.0 with Office 365 to establish single sign-on capabilities.  Because the process involves a number of tasks and steps, I wanted to share three resources that I've personally found helpful in planning, installing and configuring ADFS for use with Office 365 ...

  • Learn: Plan and deploy ADFS 2.0 with Office 365

    This guidance provides a detailed step-by-step planning and deployment checklist that walks through the considerations and implementation of ADFS.  I recommend reading this guide end-to-end before trying any of the steps so that you have a complete understanding of the entire process and the overall steps involved.  

    Important!
    After installing ADFS 2.0, be sure to apply the Update Rollup 2 hotfix as it provides important stability fixes.
  • See: Virtual Lab: Installing and Configuring Active Directory Federation Services for Office 365

    After reading the guidance above, I recommend stepping through this guided hands-on lab to see the installation steps first-hand.  It really helps to see the process in action before attempting in a live environment.
  • Practice: Setup your own Office 365 Practice Lab with the FREE Office 365 Preview program

    Now that you understand the process, it's time to try it for yourself in an real-world lab!  By leveraging the Office 365 Preview program, you can setup your own Office 365 lab environment for free during the Office 2013 beta period!  You can also leverage Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V to create your own on-premise virtualized Active Directory instance for practicing installing of the local ADFS bits.

By following these steps, I was able to get up and running with ADFS and Office 365 in less than a day!

HTH,

Keith

Have you found other tips & tricks for ADFS with Office 365?  Feel free to share them in the comments below!

More Stories By Keith Mayer

Keith Mayer is a Technical Evangelist at Microsoft focused on Windows Infrastructure, Data Center Virtualization, Systems Management and Private Cloud. Keith has over 17 years of experience as a technical leader of complex IT projects, in diverse roles, such as Network Engineer, IT Manager, Technical Instructor and Consultant. He has consulted and trained thousands of IT professionals worldwide on the design and implementation of enterprise technology solutions.

Keith is currently certified on several Microsoft technologies, including System Center, Hyper-V, Windows, Windows Server, SharePoint and Exchange. He also holds other industry certifications from IBM, Cisco, Citrix, HP, CheckPoint, CompTIA and Interwoven.

Keith is the author of the IT Pros ROCK! Blog on Microsoft TechNet, voted as one of the Top 50 "Must Read" IT Blogs.

Keith also manages the Windows Server 2012 "Early Experts" Challenge - a FREE online study group for IT Pros interested in studying and preparing for certification on Windows Server 2012. Join us and become the next "Early Expert"!

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