Welcome!

IoT User Interface Authors: Dana Gardner, Pat Romanski, JP Morgenthal, Elizabeth White, John Basso

Related Topics: Microservices Expo, Java IoT, Containers Expo Blog, IoT User Interface, Apache

Microservices Expo: Blog Feed Post

TOGAF 9.1 Released – What Does It Imply?

Here are the simple guidelines

If you are planning to take up TOGAF certification examination, you would definitely want to know how the release of TOGAF 9.1 impacts you. You would want to which version you need to study.

Here is the simple guideline. If you are planning to appear for the exam…

  1. …before June 2012 the you should study TOGAF 9
  2. …between June 2012 and May 2013 then you can study either TOGAF 9 of 9.1
  3. …after June 2013 it is only TOGAF 9.1

In a nutshell, if you have already done most of the studying using TOGAF 9.0 then you have slightly more than a year to clear the exam. However, if you have yet to begin the study you better start with 9.1.

What are the main differences between TOGAF 9 and 9.1?

The Open Group has published a presentation in the form of a PDF which provides an overview of the differences – here is the link.

If you would prefer to have a look at the difference as a two pager then I recommend that you go through this post of Mike Walker.

However, I think the biggest difference between the two is how the objectives of each of the ADM phase are written. The latest version seems to be significant improvement. This is also the most important change for those of you who want to appear for the foundation level exam.

You may also need to go through Phase E and F more carefully as they have been reworked.

Comparison of ADM Objectives – TOGAF 9 vs. TOGAF 9.1

Phase Objective as per TOGAF 9 Objective as per TOGAF 9.1
Preliminary
  • To review the organizational context for conducting enterprise architecture
  • To identify the sponsor stakeholder(s) and other major stakeholders impacted by the business directive to create an enterprise architecture and determine their requirements and priorities from the enterprise, their relationships with the enterprise, and required working behaviors with each other
  • To ensure that everyone who will be involved in, or benefit from, this approach is committed to the success of the architectural process
  • To enable the architecture sponsor to create requirements for work across the affected business areas
  • To identify and scope the elements of the enterprise organizations affected by the business directive and define the constraints and assumptions (particularly in a federated architecture environment)
  • To define the ‘‘architecture footprint’’ for the organization — the people responsible for performing architecture work, where they are located, and their responsibilities
  • To define the framework and detailed methodologies that are going to be used to develop enterprise architectures in the organization concerned (typically, an adaptation of the generic ADM)
  • To confirm a governance and support framework that will provide business process and resources for architecture governance through the ADM cycle; these will confirm the fitness-for-purpose of the Target Architecture and measure its ongoing effectiveness (normally includes a pilot project)
  • To select and implement supporting tools and other infrastructure to support the architecture activity
  • To define the architecture principles that will form part of the constraints on any architecture work
  1. Determine the Architecture Capability desired by the organization:
    • Review the organizational context for conducting enterprise architecture
    • Identify and scope the elements of the enterprise organizations affected by the Architecture Capability
    • Identify the established frameworks, methods, and processes that intersect with the Architecture Capability
    • Establish Capability Maturity target
  2. Establish the Architecture Capability:
    • Define and establish the Organizational Model for Enterprise Architecture
    • Define and establish the detailed process and resources for architecture governance
    • Select and implement tools that support the Architecture Capability
    • Define the Architecture Principles
Phase A
  • To ensure that this evolution of the architecture development cycle has proper recognition and endorsement from the corporate management of the enterprise, and the support and commitment of the necessary line management
  • To define and organize an architecture development cycle within the overall context of the architecture framework, as established in the Preliminary phase
  • To validate the business principles, business goals, and strategic business drivers of the organization and the enterprise architecture Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)
  • To define the scope of, and to identify and prioritize the components of, the Baseline Architecture effort
  • To define the relevant stakeholders, and their concerns and objectives
  • To define the key business requirements to be addressed in this architecture effort, and the constraints that must be dealt with
  • To articulate an Architecture Vision and formalize the value proposition that demonstrates a response to those requirements and constraints
  • To create a comprehensive plan that addresses scheduling, resourcing, financing, communication, risks, constraints, assumptions, and dependencies, in line with the project management frameworks adopted by the enterprise (such as PRINCE2 or PMBOK)
  • To secure formal approval to proceed
  • To understand the impact on, and of, other enterprise architecture development cycles ongoing in parallel
  1. Develop a high-level aspirational vision of the capabilities and business value to be delivered as a result of the proposed enterprise architecture
  2. Obtain approval for a Statement of Architecture Work that defines a program of works to develop and deploy the architecture outlined in the Architecture Vision

 

Phase B
  • To describe the Baseline Business Architecture
  • To develop a Target Business Architecture, describing the product and/or service strategy, and the organizational, functional, process, information, and geographic aspects of the business environment, based on the business principles, business goals, and strategic drivers
  • To analyze the gaps between the Baseline and Target Business Architectures
  • To select and develop the relevant architecture viewpoints that will enable the architect to demonstrate how the stakeholder concerns are addressed in the Business Architecture
  • To select the relevant tools and techniques to be used in association with the selected viewpoints
  1. Develop the Target Business Architecture that describes how the enterprise needs to operate to achieve the business goals, and respond to the strategic drivers set out in the Architecture Vision, in a way that addresses the Request for Architecture Work and stakeholder concerns
  2. Identify candidate Architecture Roadmap components based upon gaps between the Baseline and Target Business Architectures

 

Phase C The objective of Phase C is to develop Target Architectures covering either or both (depending on project scope) of the data and application systems domains.Information Systems Architecture focuses on identifying and defining the applications and data considerations that support an enterprise’s Business Architecture; for example, by defining views that relate to information, knowledge, application services, etc.
  1. Develop the Target Information Systems (Data and Application) Architecture, describing how the enterprise’s Information Systems Architecture will enable the Business Architecture and the Architecture Vision, in a way that addresses the Request for Architecture Work and stakeholder concerns
  2. Identify candidate Architecture Roadmap components based upon gaps between the Baseline and Target Information Systems (Data and Application) Architectures

 

Phase D The Technology Architecture phase seeks to map application components defined in the Application Architecture phase into a set of technology components, which represent software and hardware components, available from the market or configured within the organization into technology platforms.As Technology Architecture defines the physical realization of an architectural solution, it has strong links to implementation and migration planning.Technology Architecture will define baseline (i.e., current) and target views of the technology portfolio, detailing the roadmap towards the Target Architecture, and to identify key work packages in the roadmap. Technology Architecture completes the set of architectural information and therefore supports cost assessment for particular migration scenarios.

 

 

  1. Develop the Target Technology Architecture that enables the logical and physical application and data components and the Architecture Vision, addressing the Request for Architecture Work and stakeholder concerns
  2. Identify candidate Architecture Roadmap components based upon gaps between the Baseline and Target Technology Architectures

 

Phase E
  • To review the target business objectives and capabilities, consolidate the gaps from Phases B to D, and then organize groups of building blocks to address these capabilities
  • To review and confirm the enterprise’s current parameters for and ability to absorb change
  • To derive a series of Transition Architectures that deliver continuous business value (e.g., capability increments) through the exploitation of opportunities to realize the building blocks
  • To generate and gain consensus on an outline Implementation and Migration Strategy
  1. Generate the initial complete version of the Architecture Roadmap, based upon the gap analysis and candidate Architecture Roadmap components from Phases B, C, and D
  2. Deter mine whether an incremental approach is required, and if so identify Transition Architectures that will deliver continuous business value

 

Phase F
  • To ensure that the Implementation and Migration Plan is coordinated with the various management frameworks in use within the enterprise
  • To prioritize all work packages, projects, and building blocks by assigning business value to each and conducting a cost/business analysis
  • To finalize the Architecture Vision and Architecture Definition Documents, in line with the agreed implementation approach
  • To confirm the Transition Architectures defined in Phase E with relevant stakeholders
  • To create, evolve, and monitor the detailed Implementation and Migration Plan providing necessary resources to enable the realization of the Transition Architectures, as defined in Phase E
  1. Finalize the Architecture Roadmap and the supporting Implementation and Migration Plan
  2. Ensure that the Implementation and Migration Plan is coordinated with the enterprise’s approach to managing and implementing change in the enterprise’s overall change portfolio
  3. Ensure that the business value and cost of work packages and Transition Architectures is understood by key stakeholders

 

Phase G
  • To formulate recommendations for each implementation project
  • To govern and manage an Architecture Contract covering the overall implementation and deployment process
  • To perform appropriate governance functions while the solution is being implemented and deployed
  • To ensure conformance with the defined architecture by implementation projects and other projects
  • To ensure that the program of solutions is deployed successfully, as a planned program of work
  • To ensure conformance of the deployed solution with the Target Architecture
  • To mobilize supporting operations that will underpin the future working lifetime of the deployed solution
  1. Ensure conformance with the Target Architecture by implementation projects
  2. Perform appropriate Architecture Governance functions for the solution and any implementation-driven architecture Change Requests

 

Phase H
  • To ensure that baseline architectures continue to be fit-for-purpose
  • To assess the performance of the architecture and make recommendations for change
  • To assess changes to the framework and principles set up in previous phases
  • To establish an architecture change management process for the new enterprise architecture baseline that is achieved with completion of Phase G
  • To maximize the business value from the architecture and ongoing operations
  • To operate the Governance Framework
  1. Ensure that the architecture lifecycle is maintained
  2. Ensure that the Architecture Governance Framework is executed
  3. Ensure that the enterprise Architecture Capability meets current requirements

 

Here are the links to the material from The Open Group

More Stories By Udayan Banerjee

Udayan Banerjee is CTO at NIIT Technologies Ltd, an IT industry veteran with more than 30 years' experience. He blogs at http://setandbma.wordpress.com.
The blog focuses on emerging technologies like cloud computing, mobile computing, social media aka web 2.0 etc. It also contains stuff about agile methodology and trends in architecture. It is a world view seen through the lens of a software service provider based out of Bangalore and serving clients across the world. The focus is mostly on...

  • Keep the hype out and project a realistic picture
  • Uncover trends not very apparent
  • Draw conclusion from real life experience
  • Point out fallacy & discrepancy when I see them
  • Talk about trends which I find interesting
Google

@CloudExpo Stories
What does it look like when you have access to cloud infrastructure and platform under the same roof? Let’s talk about the different layers of Technology as a Service: who cares, what runs where, and how does it all fit together. In his session at 18th Cloud Expo, Phil Jackson, Lead Technology Evangelist at SoftLayer, an IBM company, spoke about the picture being painted by IBM Cloud and how the tools being crafted can help fill the gaps in your IT infrastructure.
"delaPlex is a software development company. We do team-based outsourcing development," explained Mark Rivers, COO and Co-founder of delaPlex Software, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 18th Cloud Expo, held June 7-9, 2016, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY.
Whether your IoT service is connecting cars, homes, appliances, wearable, cameras or other devices, one question hangs in the balance – how do you actually make money from this service? The ability to turn your IoT service into profit requires the ability to create a monetization strategy that is flexible, scalable and working for you in real-time. It must be a transparent, smoothly implemented strategy that all stakeholders – from customers to the board – will be able to understand and comprehe...
Traditional IT, great for stable systems of record, is struggling to cope with newer, agile systems of engagement requirements coming straight from the business. In his session at 18th Cloud Expo, William Morrish, General Manager of Product Sales at Interoute, outlined ways of exploiting new architectures to enable both systems and building them to support your existing platforms, with an eye for the future. Technologies such as Docker and the hyper-convergence of computing, networking and sto...
SYS-CON Events announced today that LeaseWeb USA, a cloud Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) provider, will exhibit at the 19th International Cloud Expo, which will take place on November 1–3, 2016, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. LeaseWeb is one of the world's largest hosting brands. The company helps customers define, develop and deploy IT infrastructure tailored to their exact business needs, by combining various kinds cloud solutions.
Using new techniques of information modeling, indexing, and processing, new cloud-based systems can support cloud-based workloads previously not possible for high-throughput insurance, banking, and case-based applications. In his session at 18th Cloud Expo, John Newton, CTO, Founder and Chairman of Alfresco, described how to scale cloud-based content management repositories to store, manage, and retrieve billions of documents and related information with fast and linear scalability. He addres...
The cloud market growth today is largely in public clouds. While there is a lot of spend in IT departments in virtualization, these aren’t yet translating into a true “cloud” experience within the enterprise. What is stopping the growth of the “private cloud” market? In his general session at 18th Cloud Expo, Nara Rajagopalan, CEO of Accelerite, explored the challenges in deploying, managing, and getting adoption for a private cloud within an enterprise. What are the key differences between wh...
Adding public cloud resources to an existing application can be a daunting process. The tools that you currently use to manage the software and hardware outside the cloud aren’t always the best tools to efficiently grow into the cloud. All of the major configuration management tools have cloud orchestration plugins that can be leveraged, but there are also cloud-native tools that can dramatically improve the efficiency of managing your application lifecycle. In his session at 18th Cloud Expo, ...
It’s 2016: buildings are smart, connected and the IoT is fundamentally altering how control and operating systems work and speak to each other. Platforms across the enterprise are networked via inexpensive sensors to collect massive amounts of data for analytics, information management, and insights that can be used to continuously improve operations. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Brian Chemel, Co-Founder and CTO of Digital Lumens, will explore: The benefits sensor-networked systems bring to ...
Much of IT terminology is often misused and misapplied. Modernization and transformation are two such terms. They are often used interchangeably even though they mean different things and have very different connotations. Indeed, it is somewhat safe to assume that in IT any transformative effort is likely to also have a modernizing effect, and thus, we can see these as levels of improvement efforts. However, many businesses are being led to believe if they don’t transform now they risk becoming ...
SYS-CON Events announced today the Enterprise IoT Bootcamp, being held November 1-2, 2016, in conjunction with 19th Cloud Expo | @ThingsExpo at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Combined with real-world scenarios and use cases, the Enterprise IoT Bootcamp is not just based on presentations but with hands-on demos and detailed walkthroughs. We will introduce you to a variety of real world use cases prototyped using Arduino, Raspberry Pi, BeagleBone, Spark, and Intel Edison. Y...
When building large, cloud-based applications that operate at a high scale, it’s important to maintain a high availability and resilience to failures. In order to do that, you must be tolerant of failures, even in light of failures in other areas of your application. “Fly two mistakes high” is an old adage in the radio control airplane hobby. It means, fly high enough so that if you make a mistake, you can continue flying with room to still make mistakes. In his session at 18th Cloud Expo, Lee...
Large scale deployments present unique planning challenges, system commissioning hurdles between IT and OT and demand careful system hand-off orchestration. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Jeff Smith, Senior Director and a founding member of Incenergy, will discuss some of the key tactics to ensure delivery success based on his experience of the last two years deploying Industrial IoT systems across four continents.
SYS-CON Events announced today that Venafi, the Immune System for the Internet™ and the leading provider of Next Generation Trust Protection, will exhibit at @DevOpsSummit at 19th International Cloud Expo, which will take place on November 1–3, 2016, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Venafi is the Immune System for the Internet™ that protects the foundation of all cybersecurity – cryptographic keys and digital certificates – so they can’t be misused by bad guys in attacks...
Identity is in everything and customers are looking to their providers to ensure the security of their identities, transactions and data. With the increased reliance on cloud-based services, service providers must build security and trust into their offerings, adding value to customers and improving the user experience. Making identity, security and privacy easy for customers provides a unique advantage over the competition.
Whether your IoT service is connecting cars, homes, appliances, wearable, cameras or other devices, one question hangs in the balance – how do you actually make money from this service? The ability to turn your IoT service into profit requires the ability to create a monetization strategy that is flexible, scalable and working for you in real-time. It must be a transparent, smoothly implemented strategy that all stakeholders – from customers to the board – will be able to understand and comprehe...
"There's a growing demand from users for things to be faster. When you think about all the transactions or interactions users will have with your product and everything that is between those transactions and interactions - what drives us at Catchpoint Systems is the idea to measure that and to analyze it," explained Leo Vasiliou, Director of Web Performance Engineering at Catchpoint Systems, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 18th Cloud Expo, held June 7-9, 2016, at the Javits Center in New York Ci...
"Tintri was started in 2008 with the express purpose of building a storage appliance that is ideal for virtualized environments. We support a lot of different hypervisor platforms from VMware to OpenStack to Hyper-V," explained Dan Florea, Director of Product Management at Tintri, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 18th Cloud Expo, held June 7-9, 2016, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY.
"Avere Systems is a hybrid cloud solution provider. We have customers that want to use cloud storage and we have customers that want to take advantage of cloud compute," explained Rebecca Thompson, VP of Marketing at Avere Systems, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 18th Cloud Expo, held June 7-9, 2016, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY.
SaaS companies can greatly expand revenue potential by pushing beyond their own borders. The challenge is how to do this without degrading service quality. In his session at 18th Cloud Expo, Adam Rogers, Managing Director at Anexia, discussed how IaaS providers with a global presence and both virtual and dedicated infrastructure can help companies expand their service footprint with low “go-to-market” costs.